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Spartans promote NB3 Foundation's Be a Game Changer campaign

Courtesy: UNCGSpartans.com
         
Release: November 13, 2011
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GREENSBORO, N.C. – UNCG's women's soccer team joined a national movement with the Notah Begay III (NB3) Foundation's Be a Game Changer campaign to help raise awareness about the fight against type 2 diabetes and obesity faced by Native American youth across the country.

The NB3 Foundation was founded in 2005 by four-time PGA TOUR winner Notah Begay III, the only full-blooded Native American on the tour.

The foundation provides health and wellness programming for Native American youth to address nutrition and healthy choices, as well as soccer and golf programs and clinics to encourage exercise and regular physical activity for native children. The NB3 Soccer Program implements youth soccer programs on Native American reservations in order to combat the epidemic of type 2 diabetes and childhood obesity and to provide a platform for youth leadership development through sport participation.

By participating in the NB3 Be a Game Changer traveling banner project, UNCG has played a critical role in promoting the efforts the NB3 Foundation and expanding soccer to a larger part of the Native American community.

"We are extremely grateful to the UNCG Spartans for participating in our project to raise awareness for our foundation and the youth we serve" said Stephanie Gabbert, director of soccer for the Notah Begay III Foundation. "This will have a direct impact on our ability to expand our reach and bring soccer to the youth of Indian Country. You are all truly Game Changers to us."

For more information, check out the NB3 Foundation website at NB3Foundation.org. There, one can also participate in the NB3 Foundation's "Give a Kid a Ball" project in an effort to provide soccer balls to Native American children.

Native American youth health statistics (courtesy NB3 Foundation):
- 44% of Native American 5 year olds are overweight and 24% are obese, twice the national average.

- 61% of Pueblo children are overweight or obese.

- Native children as young as 4 have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The average life expectancy of someone diagnosed with diabetes is 20 years after diagnosis.

- One out of two Native American children born after 2002 will get type 2 diabetes.

- UNCG -

 

UNCG Athletics News Release

 

 

 

 

 

SUBJECT: Spartans join NB3 Foundation campaign against childhood obesity, type 2 diabetes

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Phil Perry (CELL: 336-207-2383)

DATE: Nov. 14, 2011

 

 

GREENSBORO, N.C. – UNCG's women's soccer team joined a national movement with the Notah Begay III (NB3) Foundation's Be a Game Changer campaign to help raise awareness about the fight against type 2 diabetes and obesity faced by Native American youth across the country.

 

The NB3 Foundation was founded in 2005 by four-time PGA TOUR winner Notah Begay III, the only full-blooded Native American on the tour.

 

The foundation provides health and wellness programming for Native American youth to address nutrition and healthy choices, as well as soccer and golf programs and clinics to encourage exercise and regular physical activity for native children. The NB3 Soccer Program implements youth soccer programs on Native American reservations in order to combat the epidemic of type 2 diabetes and childhood obesity and to provide a platform for youth leadership development through sport participation.

 

By participating in the NB3 Be a Game Changer traveling banner project, UNCG has played a critical role in promoting the efforts the NB3 Foundation and expanding soccer to a larger part of the Native American community.

 

"We are extremely grateful to the UNCG Spartans for participating in our project to raise awareness for our foundation and the youth we serve" said Stephanie Gabbert, director of soccer for the Notah Begay III Foundation. "This will have a direct impact on our ability to expand our reach and bring soccer to the youth of Indian Country. You are all truly Game Changers to us."

 

For more information, check out the NB3 Foundation website at NB3Foundation.org. There, one can also participate in the NB3 Foundation's "Give a Kid a Ball" project in an effort to provide soccer balls to Native American children.

 

Native American youth health statistics (courtesy NB3 Foundation):

- 44% of Native American 5 year olds are overweight and 24% are obese, twice the national average.

 

- 61% of Pueblo children are overweight or obese.

 

- Native children as young as 4 have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The average life expectancy of someone diagnosed with diabetes is 20 years after diagnosis.

 

- One out of two Native American children born after 2002 will get type 2 diabetes.

 

- UNCG -

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